Gayle Ryan, Author at Memory Ball - Page 2 of 4
Memory Ball Toronto is back with its Sixth Annual Gala Event, proudly hosted by the Young Leaders Council of the Alzheimer Society of Toronto
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Author: Gayle Ryan

Despite the fact that pickled herring has been popular since medieval times, and despite spending an entire summer in Poland (where this dish is quite popular) in high school, I hadn’t actually tried pickled herring until I decided to experiment using some of Feature Foods Seafood products. In Poland I had never even noticed this Eastern European favourite, which probably had nothing to do with all of the handmade pierogies and Polish baked doughnuts made fresh every day by my friend’s Babcia...

03 03 2014 feature foods herring jar

January has come and gone, but your resolution to be more active doesn't need to. Our guest blogger, Kathleen Beveridge, has provided some yoga tips that will keep your brain and body healthy, and help you stay on track with your workout routine. yogaRegular yoga practice, meditation and physical postures are starting to spread as more and more research is done on the benefits of these activities. Let’s discuss how yoga can help those with Alzheimer’s, as well as how yoga helps to stimulate brain health. For those already diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, incorporating a regular yoga practice (with modifications and adjustments based on stage of the disease) allows for gentle physical activity, can help to reduce depression, and also provides social interaction. Yoga is based on muscle memory, rather than an intangible thought, yet this movement is actually beneficial for brain and body health.

Emma Mckay is a guest blogger for Memory Ball. She joined the Memory Ball team to help raise awareness of Alzheimer's Disease, and to support her mother who has early-onset Alzheimer's Disease. She is in her final semester of her Political Science and Communications program at McGill University. She loves sports, being active, and writing. She hopes that sharing her story will help others that are dealing with a diagnosis.  When I was seventeen years old, about a month before my high school graduation, I learned of my fifty-one year old mother’s diagnosis with early-onset Alzheimer’s Disease. Having just finalized my acceptance to McGill University, and being about to embark on an entirely new and amazing chapter of life, learning this news completely changed my life, as well as my entire family’s. It is not that the diagnosis itself came completely out of nowhere; we had been noticing small changes in my mother for a while, but the finality of a diagnosis, especially an irreversible and ultimately terminal disease such as Alzheimer’s, is truly a heart breaking thing to deal with. [caption id="attachment_2139" align="aligncenter" width="300"]photo of emma and family Emma (second from right) and her family[/caption]

This is the third installment in our 'Dealing with a Diagnosis' series. This series aims to open the discussion on Alzheimer's disease, reduce the stigma associated with the disease, and discuss the capabilities associated with the disease, not the limitations. Our hope is that with a more candid conversation surrounding Alzheimer's disease, we can encourage people to seek treatment and support earlier. Like other illnesses, an Alzheimer’s diagnosis is bound to bring about a range of emotions, both for the person who was diagnosed and their friends and family. There is no right or wrong way to feel, and your feelings may change over time. You may experience some or all of these feelings:
  • shock
  • fear
  • anger
  • resentment
  • denial
  • helplessness
  • sadness
  • frustration
  • relief
  • acceptance
  • isolation
  • sense of loss
Help for people receiving a diagnosis

This is the second installment in our 'Dealing with a Diagnosis' series. This series aims to open the discussion on Alzheimer's disease, reduce the stigma associated with the disease, and discuss the capabilities associated with the disease, not the limitations. Our hope is that with a more candid conversation surrounding Alzheimer's disease, we can encourage people to seek treatment and support earlier.
Special thanks to Marija Padjen of the Alzheimer Society of Toronto for her assistance with this article.
OK, so this blog title isn't quite accurate - we can’t really sum up what you can expect when you or a loved one is dealing with an Alzheimer’s diagnosis. There are so many factors involved, both physical and emotional, that every situation is different. There are, however, some common physical symptoms that a person with Alzheimer’s is likely exhibiting. Someone who has this disease may experience a few of these symptoms or all of them. Most of the time people think that memory loss is the number one sign of Alzheimer’s disease; however, there is a range of symptoms that someone might exhibit, and you may notice symptoms other than memory loss first.