alzheimer's disease Archives - Memory Ball
Memory Ball Toronto is back with its Sixth Annual Gala Event, proudly hosted by the Young Leaders Council of the Alzheimer Society of Toronto
Memory Ball Toronto, Toronto gala events, early-onset Alzheimer's awareness, Fundraiser, Charity Events, Alzheimer's disease, Toronto Alzheimer Society, Young Professionals
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alzheimer’s disease Tag

Looking for your daily dose of inspiration? Well then, you’re in for a treat. Today, we are pleased to feature an inspiring post from one of (the many!) inspiring member of the Memory Ball Team. Amanda McMillan has been involved in Memory Ball for the past...

Young Caregivers Read Letters To Their Parents With Alzheimer's

Every year at Memory Ball, we want to make sure everyone knows why they're attending our event. Yes, Memory Ball was the party of the year, with an animated-GIF photo booth, watercolour portrait artist Beckie di Leo, an unreal silent auction and raffle, cooler than cool DJs Alex Tribe and Guillaume Viau, burritos and of course our sexy sax band, Sax 5th Avenue. But, what's most important about Memory Ball is raising awareness of Alzheimer's disease. Without awareness, we can't vanquish this terrible disease. This is why we had a Wall of Memories, where we asked guests to contribute photos of loved ones affected by the disease for guests to see and reflect on the lives touched by Alzheimer's. One of the highlights of the evening for the organizing committee is the video we show about Alzheimer's. We feel that the video portion anchors the event into the cause and motivates attendees to truly end Alzheimer's for good. The amazingly talented Kath Fudurich (Head of Community Outreach at Memory Ball) filmed Memory Ball caregivers Claire Poirier, Katie Johns and Kath's own twin brother, Jamie Fudurich reading letters to their parents with early-onset Alzheimer's disease. Claire, Katie and Jamie were all in their teens when their respective parents were diagnosed with a form of Alzheimer's or dementia. The video is moving and there was nary a dry eye in sight when we showed it to our guests. Afterwards, a touched Cathy Barrick (our favourite CEO) declared that we would "kick Alzheimer's ass" to the cheering crowd.

Amanda Logan is an on-air personality at popular Toronto radio station Z103.5. On Saturday, March 28th, Amanda is the master of ceremonies for the sold out 4th ever Memory Ball which takes place at Palais Royale. Here, she tells us about her history with Alzheimer's.  I’m so honoured to be hosting the Memory Ball 2015. Here’s a bit about myself and my relationship with Alzheimer’s Disease. Like many, it was affected me and my family directly. When I was younger, my grandmother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease. I grew up around it. My parents sat me down as a little girl, and explained to me why grandma couldn’t remember many things. Yes, there were tough and confusing times, but what always made me feel special was that I was the one person she always remembered in a hospital room full of aunts, cousins and uncles. She passed away 18 years ago this month and I carry her spirit with me all the time. [caption id="attachment_2780" align="aligncenter" width="447"]amanda logan grandmother Amanda and her grandmother many moons ago.[/caption]

This is the third installment in our 'Dealing with a Diagnosis' series. This series aims to open the discussion on Alzheimer's disease, reduce the stigma associated with the disease, and discuss the capabilities associated with the disease, not the limitations. Our hope is that with a more candid conversation surrounding Alzheimer's disease, we can encourage people to seek treatment and support earlier. Like other illnesses, an Alzheimer’s diagnosis is bound to bring about a range of emotions, both for the person who was diagnosed and their friends and family. There is no right or wrong way to feel, and your feelings may change over time. You may experience some or all of these feelings:
  • shock
  • fear
  • anger
  • resentment
  • denial
  • helplessness
  • sadness
  • frustration
  • relief
  • acceptance
  • isolation
  • sense of loss
Help for people receiving a diagnosis